Tuesday, January 25, 2005


"The Story of Lederhosen Lucil..."
Photo by Sylvain Chuzeville of Magnolia

Pausing between beats Lucil became the Lorelei in a whole other century. After teasing a river sailor with the promise of a kiss she stepped down from the rocks and borrowed his boat, steering it along the Rhine until the far off sound of festivities floated to her ears. She saw the tent of a biergarten, abandoned the boat and went inside, beginning a silent hum under her breath, letting it grow louder into words as those near her paused, raised their eyes from their bier steins and began to notice her. The party chatter and bier talk died down as her tones floated to the far corners of the tent. All were silent, except Lucil, and every ear listened to her sing. They heard music like the happy ends of the fairy tales they had known as a child. They listened while the waves of the Rhine lapped lazily at the shore. The bier had been heaven, but this was like being in love the first time again. No one wanted it to end. In one corner of the tent sat Beethoven himself. He could hear her clearly. Lucil winked at him as she sang. Somewhere in the distance a cuckoo clock sounded. As quickly as Lucil had arrived, she slipped through a slit in the tent and was gone again. She journeyed to the Americas, traveled North to Canada, where she settled in Montreal, waiting several hundred years for the moment in her concert when she would slip back in between beats. Somewhere in another time, Beethoven went home and composed his Ninth Symphony.

Story #141

Note from Indeterminacy: To learn the secret of living happily ever after visit Lederhosen Lucil's Website and fan site. Special thanks to Sylvain Chuzeville of the band Magnolia for permission to use the photo.

3 comments:

doctor paradox said...

zees is very gut-hosen!! :) cool photo, too...

Elli said...

Nice story! So, now I'll go check out those downloads on her site and who knows, maybe Dushan and I will actually go to her concert. That is if we have enough money to buy the tckets AND still buy the Bob Dylan-tickets for October ;-)

weirsdo said...

I like the Beethoven connection, but with the cuckoo and pastoral innocence I was expecting the 6th Symphony.